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Tag: Linux

Using ddclient to Update DDNS on Google Domains

‘ddclient’ is a simple DDNS callback program developed in perl.   It reports the IP address to the DDNS server to automatically update your machines IP address.  One of the great features is that it’s compatible with Google Domains.  In order to get it working, you need  to install it from your distros package manager. (pacman, apt-get, emerge etc.)

Once installed, locate your ddclient.conf (most likely in /etc/ddclient/) and edit it with the following block:

<span style="font-family: 'courier new', courier, monospace;">daemon=300
syslog=yes
pid=/var/run/ddclient.pid
ssl=yes
 
use=web, web=https://domains.google.com/checkip
protocol=dyndns2
server=domains.google.com
login=LOGIN-FROM-GOOGLE
password=PASSWORD-FROM-GOOGLE
WWW.MYWEB.SITE</span>

For the login and password, when you log into your domains.google.com account and navigate your Synthetic records and get your username and password credentials from clicking the view option. Make sure that your website matches and the credentials are case sensitive.

Once you have updated ddclient.conf, save it, and start the system service:

sudo systemctl start ddclient.service
sudo systemctl enable ddclient.service

or for others:

sudo service ddclient start
sudo update-rc.d ddclient enable

When complete, it takes about 1-2 minutes for everything to update and then your DDNS should be working and pointing your IP address to your domain name.

Obtaining SSL Encryption Certificates for Apache on Arch Linux

This has been an issue for me for quite some time. I have been trying to get SSL working and get valid certificates so that I could secure a few things and offer better security. Additionally, these days, having secure http is an added benefit. Most web-based server functions prefer the use of https over http for the extra security as well.

Here is how I got SSL and the proper encryption installed on Arch Linux with Apache.

First, Install what you need (assuming that you already have [LAMP](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Apache_HTTP_Server) stack).

yaourt -S certbot certbot-apache acme-tiny letsencrypt-cli openssl

Next, you need to obtain the certificates. Also, I port forwarded 80 and 443 through the router to the server. This would be a good time to make sure that port forward is good or else this won’t work properly.

certbot certonly --email your.email@address.com --webroot -w /srv/http/site1/ -d www.inject.run,inject.run

If you have received the congratulations message, then you should have certificates in the designated folder. (Mine were located in /etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/fullchain.pem.)

Now we have to activate/use the certificates through Apache.

Edit /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf and uncomment the following (I use nano and ctrl+w to search):

<span style="font-family: 'courier new', courier, monospace;">LoadModule ssl_module modules/mod_ssl.so
LoadModule socache_shmcb_module modules/mod_socache_shmcb.so
Include conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf</span>

and, while you’re in httpd.conf, search for Listen 80 and add Listen 443 right below that line.

Now, this might seem like a duplication of effort, but it was the only way I got this to work:

In /etc/httpd/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf, find the Virtual Host Context section, and add your VirtualHost server information as follows:

DocumentRoot "/srv/http/inject.run"
ServerName inject.run:443
ServerAdmin YOUR.EMAIL@ADDRESS.COM
ErrorLog "/var/log/httpd/error_log"
TransferLog "/var/log/httpd/access_log"
SSLEngine on
SSLCertificateFile "/etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/fullchain.pem"
SSLCertificateKeyFile "/etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/privkey.pem"
#SSLCertificateChainFile
"/etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/chain.pem"
#SSLCACertificatePath "/etc/httpd/conf/ssl.crt"
#SSLCACertificateFile "/etc/httpd/conf/ssl.crt/ca-bundle.crt"

Note, the only two files you have to reference from your certificates are fullchain and privkey.

And, the last thing before you restart all of your services is to add a separate VirtualServer in your httpd-vhosts.conf file. Edit /etc/httpd/conf/extra/httpd-vhost.conf and add a second VirtualHost for the same website but with *:443 instead of *:80. Additionally, you are going to need to add your certificate information as well. Look below as an example:

     ServerName www.inject.run
     OTHER OPTIONS FOR VHOST HERE IF NEEDED
 
 
 
     ServerName www.inject.run
     OTHER OPTIONS FOR VHOST HERE IF NEEDED
 
     SSLEngine on
     SSLCertificateFile "/etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/fullchain.pem"
     SSLCertificateKeyFile "/etc/letsencrypt/live/inject.run/privkey.pem"

Notice I added the SSL stuff in the second VirtualHost entry.

Now, if you chose, you can remove everything from the non-encrypted VirtualHost and add the following line below the ServerName to redirect all traffic to secure connections.

Redirect / https://www.inject.run/

Hopefully, this helps get your SSL encryption working.